It’s Friday but Sunday’s Coming

Hello, David here.

S. M. Lockridge (1913-2000) was a prominent African-American preacher known for his dynamic, passionate, and fervent sermons. His most famous sermon was “He’s my King.” Several years ago author and speaker Tony Campolo was so impressed by Lockridge’s lesson on “It’s Friday. But Sunday’s Coming!” that he began to deliver the lesson himself and even wrote a book with that title.

As Christians we celebrate the cross because the story does not end on that fateful Friday. It does not end at the cross. The irony of the cross is that the very instrument Jesus’ enemies used to defeat Him became His greatest victory. Little did they know when Friday ended what would happen on Sunday, how it would impact the Roman Empire, change the course of the world’s history, usher in a new era, and provide for the fallen, sinful human race its greatest and most profound hope.  Here’s part of Lockridge’s famous sermon:


It’s Friday. The soldiers nail my Savior’s hands To the cross.
They nail my Savior’s feet To the cross.
And then they raise him up Next to criminals.
It’s Friday. But let me tell you something Sunday’s comin’.

It’s Friday. He’s hanging on the cross.
Feeling forsaken by his Father. Left alone and dying
Can nobody save him?
Ooooh It’s Friday. But Sunday’s comin’.

It’s Friday. The earth trembles. The sky grows dark.
My King yields his spirit. It’s Friday.
Hope is lost. Death has won.
Sin has conquered. and Satan’s just a laughin’.

It’s Friday. Jesus is buried. A soldier stands guard.
And a rock is rolled into place.
But it’s Friday. It is only Friday.
Sunday is a comin’!

The three days over Easter is all about death, burial, and resurrection.  This trinity of events is wholly and entirely significant in itself, however there are also many meanings of Easter.  As Christians, we experience many Easter struggles – and not just at Easter-  things die, are buried and then new hope eventually rises again.  There are three questions that we often ask ourselves in our Easter experience:

The Friday question – “What is happening and where did things go so wrong?”
The Saturday question – “Why do I have so many doubts?”
The Sunday question – “How could I have missed this?”

The answers to all of these questions of struggle are found in the story of Easter.  It’s all about redemption and restoration and knowing that there is a greater story and we all have a part to play.

This Easter may you begin to explore the answers to your Easter questions.  May the risen Jesus show you the way and may you always remember that it may be Friday – but Sunday is coming.

Sunday is Coming

Death or so so it seemedcross alone
Darkness filled Friday
Doubt began its death march.
But Sunday is coming

Burial and the tomb
Bereft of their friend
Belief overturned by betrayal
But Sunday is coming

Sunday staggers belief
Sun shines on the
Shoulders of the
Risen Jesus

The moment of wonder
That restored us
That redeemed us
Is here

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s